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Report: LGBTQ elected officials increased by 17% in past year

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A new report from the LGBTQ Victory Fund found that LGBTQ elected officials have reached a new high in the past year.

There are 986 known* out LGBTQ elected officials in the United States, a 17% increase in the past year, according to LGBTQ Victory Institute’s Out for America 2021 report released on Wednesday, July 28.

The report found that in the past year (between June 2020 and June 2021):

  • LGBTQ elected officials of color increased by 51%, with Black LGBTQ elected officials growing at the fastest pace (a 75% increase);
  • Trans women elected officials increased by 71% (from 21 to 36), yet trans men saw no increase (with just five serving nationwide);
  • Queer-identified elected officials increased by 83%, faster than all other sexual orientations
  • LGBQ cisgender women state legislators surpassed the number of GBQ cisgender men state legislators for the first time.

The report also found that:

  • LGBTQ elected officials are significantly more racially and ethnically diverse than the overall elected official population, but are less diverse than the U.S. population;
  • Mississippi is the only state in the nation with zero known out LGBTQ elected officials serving;
  • 23 states have transgender elected officials serving and 29 states have non-cisgender elected officials;
  • LGBTQ people are equitably represented among mayors of top 100 cities for the first time (with six), but are underrepresented among mayors overall and in all other public positions; and that
  • 84 percent of LGBTQ elected officials are Democrats and just three percent are Republicans.

The full report is available at victoryinstitute.org/out-for-america-2021.

“While LGBTQ elected officials are growing steadily in number, at this pace it will still take decades to come anywhere close to achieving equitable representation in government,” said Annise Parker, president and CEO of the Victory Institute. “This lack of representation has enormous consequences, because LGBTQ elected officials are best positioned to defend against anti-LGBTQ legislative attacks and to change the hearts and minds of colleagues in supporting inclusive policies.”

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